Beach Safety Signs- Phew what a scorcher!

Beach Safety – RNLI Beach Safety Signs

The hottest April on record certainly drew us all to the sea – or so it seemed judging by the traffic jams over the Easter weekend. With this earlier than usual start to the “beach Season” its worth reminding ourselves that the seaside can be a dangerous environment if lack of awareness or respect for the power of water leads to complacency and then possibly onto tragic drama. How can we look after our own beach safety and that of our families, as well as that of others, when we enjoy that Great British institution – a day at the seaside?

Another iconic institurion, the RNLI, has been at the forefront of a campaign to improve beach safety as part of its overall role as ‘the charity that saves life at sea’. Ever since 7 years agowhen a four year old boy was drowned whilst on a beach in Cornwall, the lack of information through signage was seen by Ryan’s mother as a major contributing factor to this tradgedy. Subsequently the RNLI have produced an extremely comprehensive guide to beach safety, in particular the use of beach safety information signs.

For safety at the beach, of course, it is not enough just to put up beach safety signs and have an understandable system of warning flags; people who visit the beach have a responsibility to ‘read, mark and inwardly digest’ what the signs and flags mean, as well as keeping an eye out for the safety of in particular theirs and other children.

When you go to the beach, check whether the facility has been signed up effectively – the signs are on both the RNLI website and the Stocksigns web catalogue (RNLI approved) pages 142 and 143. Here are some examples.

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If not, why not tackle the operator or the local council about their absence. It may save a life. Above all, be aware and sensible, we know that water can be terifyingly destructive.

For information on general beach safety signs and their means visit our post water safety signs