Road Signs do they confuse you? survey by confused.com

Road signs? Confused? – You are not alone confirms Confused.comroad signs confused.com research‘s latest research.

Insurance website confused.com have recently published the results of a road signs survey to test the nation’s understanding of signs.

The research should some startling results;

An astonishing 93 per cent failed to recognise the traffic signs for “no vehicles except bikes being pushed”.

Meanwhile 83 per cent were unclear on the meaning of the common “Urban Clearway” sign, and 67 per cent were bamboozled by the “no waiting”  sign.

Top five confusing road signs

 

Confused.com polled 2,000 people on which road signs they found the most confusing and the following five were voted the most perplexing.

Read more: http://www.confused.com/car-insurance/articles/brits-bamboozled-confused-by-road-signs#ixzz2MCVXuguD

Street Name plates, where do street names come from?

The Origins of London’s Street Names

ST Paul churchyard street name plate, road name, road signsStocksigns has been manufacturing street name plates for many years. Over this time we have seen not only the style of signs change but also some of the roads’ actual names change. So we thought we would take a look at how some streets have gained their names.

According to the BBC, The City of London contains no roads. There are plenty of streets, squares and alleys, but traditionally not a single road. The reason for the historic anomaly is because the word ‘road’ was not coined until the late 16th Century, after nearly all the thoroughfares in the ancient City had already been named.

Before the 19th century, street names were typically generic and descriptive, usually named after the goods sold in them e.g. Bread Street. After this it became commonplace for streets to bear the name of renowned figures from British history. But while it is obvious where some streets derive their names, others have been corrupted over the centuries and have altogether less obvious roots. Just for fun we have listed some of the London road names and their origins. To find out more about London’s historic roads visit http://www.londononline.co.uk/streetorigins/.

Godliman street wall mounted street signGodliman Street, (EC4)  

It is not easy to account for the origin of the name as applied to this street, but “Godelmynges” were a kind of cordwain made from the skin of a young animal, this name being apparently derived from Godalming, where the trade of tanning is still carried on (Lib. Albus, I. 231, and III. 323).

From: ‘Globe Yard – Gofairlane’, A Dictionary of London (1918). URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=63143  

cannon sreet name plate Cannon Street, (EC4)

A corruption of Canwick, or Candlewick Street, which took its name from being the abode of candle-makers. In this street also, many weavers of woollen cloth were settled in business, having been brought from Flanders by Edward III, and their meetings were held in the churchyard of St. Lawrence Poultney. (Reference: Smith’s Streets of London, p. 381)

Leadenhall street name plateLeadenhall Street, (EC3)

So called from “Leaden Hall,” a large and ponderous-looking mansion inhabited about the year 1309 by Sir Hugh Neville. In 1408 it was purchased by Whittington, Lord Mayor of London, who presented it to the Corporation. (Reference: Jesse’s London, vol. II, p. 341)

Downing street name plateDowning Street, (SW1)

Derives its name from Sir George Downing, Secretary to the Treasury in the reign of Charles II. Here stands the official residence of the First Lord of the Treasury, conferred by George II on his favourite minister, Sir Robert Walpole, and on his successors in that high office for ever. (Reference: Jesse’s London, vol. I, p. 165)

Stocksigns  manufactures high quality street nameplates for many councils and boroughs. Signs can be manufactured using a variety of materials and techniques. Using traditional sign making techniques such as die pressed metal or vitreous enamel, not only look good, but are often the most long lasting solutions.  Contact our Sales Team for more information.

Traffic Signs – Protecting Children

Road Traffic Warning Signs around Children’s Play Areas

Stocksigns has long been famous for manufacturing good quality traffic signs, and boasts an extensive range. The importance of traffic warning signs is evident from their common place use but here is what RoSPA (Royal Society for the Prevention of Accidents) says about Traffic Signs and their use for protecting children.

RoSPA’s Traffic Signs Guide

Traffic signs are a common site through out our road network or where children have to cross, or walk adjacent to a road, to access a play area some form of traffic control is advisable. Whilst most measures are beyond the resources of the smaller authorities, the provision of standard warning signs advising motorists that they are approaching an area where children play is economic and is advised. There are standard signs available and in most cases the relevant highways authority will provide such signage.

Signs should be clearly visible from all approach directions and should be positioned sufficiently far away from te area to enable motorists, if necessary, to adjust their speed to an acceptable level. The signs should be placed so as not to be obscured by planting growth.

Warning signs not only (hopefully) reduce motorist’s speed but also raise their awareness of the presence of children.

As well as providing traffic signs care should be taken to ensure that planting, other road signs, or other roadside materials do not obscure sight lines for both motorists and pedestrian. This may mean keeping hedges and verges well cut back.

Stocksigns and RoSPA

Stocksigns is RoSPA (Royal Socisty of the Prevention of Accidents) official safety signs partner. Read more about our safety signs partnership

Bike Safety – a simple common sense guide to cycle safety signs.

cycle safety signs,cycle route signsBike safety – a common sense guide to cycle safety signs

As the days lengthen and the temperature rises, so does one’s enthusiasm for taking the bicycle out of the shed and setting off down country lanes, along old railway lines or taking the cycle paths or lanes that are now available to make cycling both more enjoyable and above all safer – safe for both cyclists themselves, as well as other users of the public highways.bike safety signs, cycle lane

 Bike safety – bike accessories & cycle routes

think bike - cycle safety signsObviously we have to make sure our own bicycles themselves are safe, before pedalling off – tyres, chains, bike lights, cycle helmets and brakes all need to be checked. After that we have to look at our own cycling safety particularly on Public roads and especially in the presence of large vehicles. Nowadays you can see special cycle safety signs on the back of lorries warning of the visibility problems that drivers can have if you get too close.cycle warning sign
Secondly, cyclists should use dedicated lanes or pathways both for their own safety and out of consideration for others. Life can be so much more relaxed and enjoyable with a bit of common courtesy – ‘do as you would be done by’ is a useful mantra. This cuts both ways of course, and motorists have not only to respect specific cycle routes but more generally need to be aware of other road users, as do cyclists in relevant circumstances .bike safety - cyclists dismount
Sometimes exclusive cycle parking locations are provided. Please use them for the security of your own property at the very least.

It goes wothout saying the law and Highway Code needs to be obeyed. Don’t cross traffic lights at red, for example, or ride more than two abreast. Above all everybody should use their own common sense.

Safety is the responsibility of every road user, and this coupled with politeness, can make the bike parking signouting, however short, on self powered two wheels an enjoyable and life-enhancing experience- On your bike!

For more information on road signs and bike safety signs visit our on line signs shop or call Tel. 01737 77 40 72

Mobile phones and driving – protect your fleet

prohibition health and safety signs, mobile phones and driving

Mobile Phones & Driving

A substantial body of research shows that using a hand-held or hands-free mobile phone while driving is a significant distraction, and substantially increases the risk of the driver crashing.

Safety Signs and Training for Drivers

Stocksigns offer a range of transport safety signs and driving resources to help protect your staff and fleet. As a working partner of RoSPA we are proud to offer access to RoSPA Fleet Training and consultancy as well as a host of traffic signs.

For more details on Driver Development courses, Advanced Driver Training and Driver Risk Assessment tools such as “Driver Profiler” please call us on 01737764764 for more information.

Prohibition Mobile Phone Safety Signs

The issue of drivers using mobile phones just won’t go away, government and police schemes to raise awareness of the dangers of mobile phones has failed to eradicate the problem. We have a range of safety posters and signs to help you look after your staff and fleet including prohibition signs, traffic signs, information and hazard signs. Visit our signs shop or order a catalogue to learn more.

Drivers who use a mobile phone, whether hand-held or hands-free:

  • Are much less aware of what’s happening on the road around them.
  • Fail to see road signs.
  • Fail to maintain proper lane position and proper speed.
  • Are more likely to ‘tailgate’ the vehicle in front.
  • React more slowly and take longer to brake.
  • Are more likely to enter unsafe gaps in traffic.
  • Feel more stressed and frustrated.

They are also four times more likely to crash, injuring or killing themselves and/or other people – RoSPA

 health and safety signs catalogue